Photo Diary: Walking around Deoksugung on a Seoul Summer’s Day

Walking around Deoksugung Taking Photos

This week, what was supposed to be an innocent trip to Kinko’s turned into a lovely stroll around Deoksugung. Walking around Deoksugung was so peaceful and gave me such a cool relief from the sticky summer air here in Seoul. I spotted many beautiful l things along the way and I of course had to document it all. If you head to this part of Seoul near City Hall, you will be sure to find a lovely cafe, sculpture, gallery or restaurant along the way.

Lunch at ‘Le Pul’, Jung-gu / 르폴

I ate a delicious chicken panini from a little cafe called ‘Le Pul’ and really enjoyed the familiar feeling the interiors gave me. Definitely check out the cafe if you are ever in that area and in need of a cheap and quick fresh lunch!

General Drink Shop / 제너럴 드링크샵

On my way home, I was desperate to quench my thirst so I stopped off at the General Drink Shop in Gwangwhamun. I had just been to Kyobo Book Store to stock up on my sticker collection and buy a new Moleskine diary. I loveed this drink, I ordered a Lemon Jasmine Ice Tea. YUM! And also, how cute is the cup it came in? Love it.

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What I’m wearing in Seoul this Summer – Minimal Korean Style

Summer is HOT this year in Seoul

I read that this summer in Korea has one of the hottest heat waves in 111 years! This week, I decided to film a Summer in Korea Lookbook. I wanted to show you what I have been wearing this summer in Korea. I love minimal Korean fashion, and I think my style has changed a lot since moving here. Styling clothes is one of those secret things that I do that nobody knows about but it brings me a lot of joy. I have been doing this since I was at LEAST 14. This hobby resulted in many questionable outfits. I talk a bit more about why you should just do things you want to do and not worry about whether or not people think you are completely just the worst ever… in this video!

To be honest, I was inspired by my fashion icon Jenny Walton who never looks afraid to share her outfits or share her thoughts. This one is for you, Jenny. Is that weird? Sorry. It’s not for you, it’s for me.

Just do that thing that you love!

I explained at the beginning of the video about my experience feeling like a loser posting this kind of look-book content on the internet. I started a YouTube channel in 2015 and suddenly deleted all of my videos in one foul swoop out of sheer *embarrassment*. However, here I am six years later, still making this kind of content and still loving it. So the long story short of all of this is if you’re holding back from doing something you really want to do because you’re worried of what people will think, just do it anyway. Nobody actually cares, and people who love you will just be happy to see you doing what makes you happy, whether or not they actually read/watch/consume/listen to what you are making.

Here is the video below, feel free to check it out! Alternatively, you can just look at the stills of the outfits down below if you’re short on time! Thank you so much for supporting my channel and my blog, I feel like I am finally getting more confident to upload content!

Where I buy clothes in Korea

Most of the items are labelled in the video! Not Linked though….BUT in Korea, I mostly buy my clothes from these stores:

I find Korean clothing to be incredibly flimsy and low-quality. At this point in time, these brands are better for me financially because they wash well, the fabrics are better quality and they are in my price range.

Minimal Korean Lookbook

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Why is the food in Yeosu 800 times better than anywhere else in Korea?

Is it the water? Is it the clean(er?) air? Is it the… people? I am not sure what it is, but each time we go to Yeosu to visit my husband’s family, we eat the best food in the world. I am always too full to fully enjoy it. It just tastes so good? So, if you are in Korea and you don’t know what to do on your summer break this year, go down to Yeosu. I would recommend staying at the Amort Hotel on the beach. Enjoy it and thank me later.

The best photo I’ve ever taken
Raw fish
Chinese food
Crab, sweet potato tempura, fishy soup
Coffee time
Amort Hotel, Yeosu

How to get a non-teaching job in South Korea

Hi job seekers, are you having a hard time finding a job in Korea? I’m sorry to hear that, but it’s also a pretty normal and common situation to be in as an expat. So it’s fine. It’ll be fine. You’re fine. BUT, just in case, I’m here to give you some handy tips on how to get started with what may feel like a never-ending quest. I have a degree in job rejection, but luckily I got a PhD in bouncing back. First, let’s break some things down with a series of questions to see where you’re at, and then you’ll get all of the juicy links to the sites and the things.

First things first, what kind of visa do you have in Korea?

The type of visa you have is the key ingredient employers are looking for in Korea. If a job description explicitly states the visa requirements you must fulfill, make sure you fulfill them! Wow, what great advice!

Do not bother applying for jobs if you don’t have the correct visa. It is a waste of time for both you and the employer.

Here is a good article that explains the different work visas here in Korea. Please note, it does not include F visas. Make sure you are aware of any working restrictions your visa has and whether or not your potential employer would be willing to sponsor you. Once you have sorted that out, let’s move onto the next step.

Photo by Jana Sabeth on Unsplash

Why do you want to work in South Korea?

This sounds like a pretty simple question, but it is important for your job search. The answer to this question will help you determine where to look for a job and what to include in your applications and CVs.

Are you interested in the language? Are you interested in a particular industry that is unique to South Korea? Have you been studying Korean? Etc.

If your answer to any of these questions is, ‘because I love BTS and I want to be a professional ARMY member’, then it might be time to think seriously about what you want to do in Korea!

How should I write a CV in Korea and do people need Cover Letters?

It is okay to submit CVs in English to many jobs here in Korea. If you are a fluent Korean speaker, you will need to submit your CV in Korean as a Word document (from what I have seen). Additional documents like portfolios and cover letters can also be in English, in whatever format you desire (but just check what the employer wants). Make sure you tailor your CV and portfolio to the specific job you want to apply for. You should never use the same CV on jobs with different job descriptions. If you want to know more about this process, scroll down to watch a YouTube video that I made about starting your career overseas! Some jobs will ask for a cover letter, but it is not a common requirement in Korea.

Websites for Job Hunting in Korea

Glassdoor / LinkedIn

Korean companies use these job sites to post jobs. *Shocking*. Most job postings are in Korean, but foreign companies typically post their listings in English. It is a good idea to turn on notifications for particular searches to get notified when the perfect job pops up! For example, turn on notifications on LinkedIn for ‘Engineering Roles in Seoul’. Make sure your profile is in good shape before you start applying for every job you see.

Non-Teaching Job Seekers Korea (Facebook Group)

This is a FB group run by foreigners in Korea and is a great place to join during your job search. It has a wide range of jobs on there but they are posted sporadically. Foreign employers will often post about opportunities at their companies. You have to request to join, and make sure you follow all of their rules!

Craigslist

Sadly, Craigslist is the preferred method for hiring foreign workers in South Korea. Nobody is happy about it, but you can occasionally find a diamond in the rough, so it is worth checking periodically. Be careful about scammers and weirdos. If a job posting has a link to their website, that’s usually a good indication that it’s legitimate. I have been to several job interviews through Craigslist and have had multiple jobs through the platform. BUT be smart and don’t expect to find your dream job!

Seoul Global Center Job Search

The Seoul Global Center is a great resource for foreigners living in Korea. They have multiple centers in Seoul and host Korean classes, cooking classes and other cultural events. The Jobs board is not updated frequently, but always keep your eye out for any opportunities that may come up!

If you have Korean skills, try here:

Saramin

Job Korea

Startup-specific Job Boards

Rocket Punch

It’s like Korean LinkedIn for Startups – Requires Korean Skills

Seoul Startups Job Board

Great place to find jobs in the Seoul startup scene. It is also worth joining their Slack group as people often post jobs and events happening in there. It is an amazing community and has been really helpful for me in Korea.

Job Bridge Korea

Another site that looks specifically for foreign workers in Korea.

Instagram Communities

When all else fails, find people on Instagram who work in your desired industry, and follow them. It is a good idea to build up a community on social media, no matter which country you want to live in. Not only can it help you network for your career, but it can also help you find friends, feel less lonely and learn about what’s happening around town.

My videos about working in Korea:

Life in Korea Blog Content

What a polluted day in Seoul looks like

The arrival of winter weather in Seoul means dusty air and chilling winds. A few weeks ago, I braved both the air and the wind to visit the Seoul Animation Center. Despite the smog-covered city, I managed to take some photos along the way. When pollution levels are high in Seoul, not only can you see it in the sky, but you can also feel it in your chest, your throat and in your head. Everything feels a bit sluggish and… bleh. The best way to take care of your health on polluted days is to stay indoors, try not to exercise heavily outside, invest in an air purifier for your home, wear a KF94 face mask and drink plenty of water. I use the app ‘Mise mise’ to keep up with the air quality levels in Korea.

I took some images, but I also managed to film some clips and put them into a YouTube video. I used to film these kinds of videos a lot when I first got my DSLR and was living in Melbourne. The footage is sitting somewhere among all of my hard-drives and memory cards. I absolutely loved filming these clips in the Myeongdong area of Seoul, and hope to make more videos like this in the future. I hope you enjoy!

Namsan Tower hiding away in a smoggy sky

Quieter streets in Myeongdong

Taking the bus over the han river

Hwaseong Fortress: UNESCO World Heritage Site in South Korea

There are fourteen listed UNESCO World Heritage Sites here in South Korea, and one of them is only a 15-minute drive from my home. Hwaseong Fortress is located in the Gyeonggi Province city of Suwon. Suwon is also home to some of Korea’s biggest tech company HQs like Samsung and LG.

The fortress was built in the 18th century by King Jeongjo for defensive and political purposes. It was also built to house the tomb of the King’s father. The Suwoncheon stream runs through the centre of the fortress, which you can see in images below. UNESCO’s website state the following about the incredible features of the fortress:

‘The walls incorporate a number of defensive features, most of which are intact. These include floodgates, observation towers, command posts, multiple arrow launcher towers, firearm bastions, angle towers, secret gates, beacon towers, bastions and bunkers’.

Information Source

If you’re looking for a new place to explore, not too far from Seoul, I would highly recommend visiting the Hwaseong Fortress. The site boasts gorgeous views of Suwon and is a great way to get in a mini-hike on the weekend. People were starting to set up picnics along the stream now that the weather is warming up here. There are also lots of beautiful modern cafes juxtaposed against traditional Korean architecture and the surrounding fortress. Here is the cafe we visited. Scroll to the end of this post to find out how to get there.

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How to Get There

Train and Bus

Take the Line 1 train to Suwon Station and catch the 66 Bus to the fortress

How to Order Coffee in Korean

If you ever travel to South Korea, or you’re already here, you will most likely spend a lot of your time in cafes, ordering coffee and then drinking said coffee. Coffee is a big part of Korea’s culture, and is viewed as more of a social drink rather than a ‘if I don’t have a coffee before this meeting, my brain might explode’ kind of drink/fuel.

So, here is a little cheat sheet if you are coming to Korea and want to perfect your coffee ordering skills. For help with reading and listening, copy and paste any new words into Papago to listen. Keep scrolling for an English translation.

S = Sales Assistant, C = Customer ( You!)

S: 안녕하세요. 주문하시겠어요? Or 뭐 드릴까요?

C: 따뜻한 카페라떼 한 잔 주세요.

S: 사이즈는 어떻게 해 드릴까요?

C: 톨 사이즈로 해 주세요.

S: 드시고 가세요?

C: 네, 맞아요.

S: 따뜻한 카페라떼 톨 사이즈 한 잔 맞으세요?

C: 네.

S: 네, 4,500 원 입니다.

—–beep boop beep boop credit card sounds—-

S: 영수증 드릴까요?

C: 괜찮아요. 버려주세요.

S: 옆에서 잠시만 기다려주세요.

C: 네, 감사합니다.

—–coffee machine sound—-

Barista: 36번 고객님, 따뜻한 카페라떼 나왔습니다.

C: 감사합니다.

B: 맛있게 드세요.

—–drink coffee for 4 hours—-

English Translation

S = Sales Assistant, C = Customer

S: Hello. Are you ready to order? Or What can I get you?

C: One cup of hot cafe latte, please.

S: What size would you like?

C: Tall size, please.

S: Is that for here?

C: Yes, that’s right.

S: So, that’s one tall hot cafe latte?

C: Yes.

S: Okay, that’s 4,500 won, please.

—–beep boop beep boop credit card sounds—-

S: Do you want a receipt?

C: It’s okay. Please throw it away.

S: Please wait over there for a moment.

C: Yes, thank you.

—–coffee machine sound—-

Barista: Customer 36, your cafe latte is ready.

C: Thank you.

B: Enjoy

—–drink coffee for 4 hours—-

What to Wear in Seoul in December

Brrrr… it’s chilly in this city. I’m pretty sure I just saw snow in my bathroom (not really). When I first came to Korea in 2017, I had no idea how cold things would get come December. This lead to me jumping on my bicycle, racing to the closest Uniqlo from my dormitory, and buying anything that looked like it would keep me warm. Two years later, and I am still wearing the items I bought that day.

I want to help you avoid this shock if you’re planning on coming to Seoul in the cold months of late November, December, and January. This could also be helpful if you’re planning to come to Korea to be an English teacher. Planning your wardrobe for four seasons is hard when you have airline luggage restrictions to consider.

On Looking Good in Winter

Let’s get one thing out of the way, looking cute and stylish is HARD in winter. Once you’ve layered your heat tech and jumpers, you look more like a marshmallow than a fashion icon. Accept it. Be warm. Keep your coat on even though you want to show off your outfit. And don’t let instagram likes dictate the way you dress.

Winter Formula for Getting Dressed:

(Thermal Leggings + Thermal Top + Socks) + Bottom Layer + Jumper + Coat + More Socks + Gloves + Beanie + Scarf – Inappropriate Summer Fabrics + Shoes = You MIGHT be warm today

Basics

Before we get into some the outfits I wore in December, let’s go through my Korean winter essentials. Because I am a foreigner living in Korea, I don’t have a huge wardrobe full of cute outfits. It’s hard to transport an entire wardrobe across the Pacific Ocean. These are the items I can’t live without, so you may be seeing these items recurring throughout the outfits!

1. Cashmere Jumper

2. Warm Scarf

3. Wool Coat / Long Padding Jacket

4. Knee High Boots / Leather Boots

5. Waterproof Sneakers

6. Heat Tech Leggings and Turtle Necks

7. WARM Gloves

8. Wool Beanie / Beret / Ear Muffs

Pro Tip: if you’re planning to move to Korea or any colder climate, the best thing to do is look out for cashmere sales! I picked up my jumper at a huge sale at Vin Prime, a second hand clothing store here in Korea. The quality of your clothes really makes a difference when staying warm, and it doesn’t have to make you broke! My jumper was only $20 and it’s 100% Cashmere.

Outfit #1: Christmas Tree Chic

This first outfit was taken at the beginning of December, hence the bare ankles. I can get away without an extra layer under these pants because they are so WARM, which is why I spent money that was out of my budget to buy them… I paired the pants with some black boots, a cashmere jumper over a t-shirt and a coat. On warmer winter days, you can get away with not wearing any thermal or heat tech layers!

The best investment I made this winter was this pair of green wool structured trousers from COS. They fit me like a glove and are so warm and cosy. I wanted something that looked professional but at the same time would keep me warm. I made this investment back when I thought getting a non-teaching job in Korea was a piece of cake… Also, they look like grass but for your pant legs!

Outfit #2: Incognito Shopping Trip

I love these grey lambs wool leggings that I bought from the Australian brand Country Road FOUR years ago! They are still keeping me warm. The tote is from a Museum in Singapore and the beanie is from a flea market in Japan. I kind of look like I’m on my way to rob a bank, and I’m okay with that.

This is often how I dress when walking to the supermarket – how exciting. These are my Adidas sneakers that I bought in summer and they are the coolest sneakers I’ve ever owned.

Outift #3: Horse Rider Takes on Inner City Shopping Centre

This horse riding look is my favourite to wear because of these BOOTS. I got these brown leather boots in a Zara sale last year and they make me feel like a powerful yet bohemian lady. These are the shoes that make me want to get dressed on cold mornings. I love wearing them with tight jeans so I can show off the whole boot. When I cover them in pant or skirt fabric, the boots don’t get to shine! Again, here is my cashmere jumper that I wear basically everyday, cashmere scarf and my padding jacket. I know Koreans aren’t overly fond of Uniqlo, but I couldn’t survive winter here without their clothes.

I planned on taking more awkward selfies but then we moved house and life did that thing that it does where you suddenly don’t have time to do things. However, most of my outfits look like the ones you saw above in various combinations. I unintentionally have a capsule wardrobe situation due to aforementioned lack of luggage allowance and general lack of money to buy clothes!

Bonus Outfits from December!

Let’s start with this navy moment I had when I went ice skating.

Here is a Christmas look – I love that I can wear my running shoes with jeans and a coat without looking like a business woman on a long commute? When I know I’m going to be walking around a lot, I have to whisper ‘not today’ to my beloved brown boots and opt for these.

Hugging my bag in the middle of the street.

Road trip outfit in a highway rest stop bathroom

With my friend at Ader Error in Hongdae.

Who is that crazy lady taking self timer pics of her toilet paper outfit??? With her eyes closed?

I’m really sad looking at this photo because I have since lost this scarf. I was doing a very quick job situation in Gangnam, and I dropped it somewhere. It was my favourite Uniqlo cashmere scarf and I can’t seem to find a replacement as soft (and affordable) as this one. Edit: I found the exact same scarf in pink, but I still mourn the loss of this one 🙁

I hope you enjoyed my foray into fashion blogging. The moral of the story is choose warmth over style and comfort over ‘but I want to look cute today’. Let me know what your winter staples are and where you like to shop. Have a great day!

Ice Skating at City Hall in Seoul, South Korea

Merry Christmas to the four people who consistently read my blog! I hope you had a great time with loved one(s) and reflected on the year we’ve just had. I have been absent on my blog due to visa struggles and moving house! All of our dilemmas have been solved and we are back to our happy normal life selves. My husband and I recently ventured further south east to Yongin in Gyeonggi Province. We feel so excited to move a little further from Seoul away from the chaos…

Today, we spent our afternoon gliding around City Hall’s ice skating rink in an attempt to enact Frozen 2 on ice. It was my first time strapping into ice skating boots and slipping on ice (I’m Australian, this is all foreign to me, I’ve never even been skiing). I managed to find my rhythm rather quickly thanks to many summers spent rollerblading in my local neighbourhood.

There was ample space for skaters of all varieties: speedsters, grandpas, clusters of friends who all kept falling over, and nervous parents. There was a special section for little kids to learn how to skate and it was the cutest thing I’ve ever seen. As well as the learning zone, there was a separate rink for kids and parents to fall over in. I also saw some people playing curling and assumed they were Canadian because who plays curling? Does one ‘play curling‘ or simply just ‘curl‘?

In any case, I regretted not wearing a cape for this icy occasion but I’m pretty sure I’m a contender for Disney’s Frozen 2 On Ice Korea Tour 2020. My husband seemed to be a seasoned skater and glided around effortlessly. He’s good at almost everything so it was no surprise that he had skater’s legs and could spin without hesitation!

How to Ice Skate in Seoul:

If you’re visiting Seoul between Jan and Feb, the ice skating fun will be up and running. Just head to City Hall station on line 2 or line 1 and follow the signs! It’s hard to miss. We were lucky to have a sunny blue sky over us as we skated! It costs 1,000 KRW (roughly $1) to skate for 1 hour including skates and a helmet! How cheap! Also, bring a 500 won coin to use the lockers to keep all of your belongings safe (not that anyone would touch them in Korea!)

An Afternoon Well Spent in Gangnam, South Korea

I had another social day today, this time we were in Gangnam. We started our adventure in a Vietnamese restaurant called ‘Tam Tam’, which had queues of people waiting to be seated. We enjoyed our soupy pho noodles up at a really high table – the waiter literally had to push our chairs in for us because the seats were so high! The food was delish, but we had to be very careful after eating not to roll our ankles whilst trying to come back down to earth. You can see in this pic, the chairs are at the waiter’s hipbone!

Our teacher fashioned some makeshift chopstick holders out of napkins! So gorgeous!

This is a hill that my friend kindly escorted me down. It was so steep and I was in heeled boots, not a great combo!!


After lunch, we moved onto a cafe nearby! Two of my friends had flavourless tea and had to send them back. I don’t remember the name of the cafe so I can’t tell you. Despite their drinks being a disappointment, we sat here for hours and had a good quality chat. The cafes in Gangnam are so cosy in the wintertime. You can sit there for hours without being guilted into leaving or buying another drink.

How To:

If you’re wanting to explore the cafes and restaurants in Gangnam, go to Gangnam station on line 2, take exit 11, kep walking straight and head right up the small alleyways! There are an endless range of food and shopping options!