How to Make Korean Bibim Cold Noodles

How to Make Korean ‘Bibim’ Cold Noodles

This week I was asked to evaluate some delicious Korean foods that are being exported to the Australian market. One of the items in the package was ‘Bibim Noodles’, aka Korean cold instant noodles that are perfect for summer. I thought it would be a good idea to make a video on how to make Korean ‘Bibim’ cold noodles. I have a sneaky feeling that western people don’t know a lot about making cold noodles. So here it is! The people asked, and I delivered.

I have to admit, when I first tried these ‘Bibimmyeon’ or ‘Bibim Noodles’ back in 2017, I was not a huge fan. I am happy to report that after being reintroduced to them for this project, and I am already a huge fan. We only have one packet left!

In Korean ‘Bibim’ means mixed and ‘Myeon’ means Noodles. So they are literally mixed noodles. They can be served either warm or cold, but because of this sweltering Seoul heat, I decided to show you how to make them cold.

This video contains the simple steps needed to make the cold noodles. All you need to do is boil some water, cook the noodles, drain the water, mix the noodles in some cold water (and ice!), add the sauce and mix! I added some colourful peeled cucumber, seaweed and chilli flakes for the fun of it. I really enjoyed making this video and I decided to edit it with a really chilled, ASMR type, in the cafe listening to jazz piano vibe. Enjoy! Let me know if you have tried Bibimmyeon in the comments!

Watch the full video on YouTube here and subscribe to my channel!

Korean Cold Noodles

More Food Content

Hola Aloe – Korean Heat Wave Drink Idea

🍋 Hola Hola! 🥭

This week I got to sample a bunch of yummy Korean products that are entering the Australian market. It is part of the KFoodies program! I am not usually a fan of Aloe drinks but these Hola Aloe flavoured drinks are delish! The whole household has been enjoying them this week so the bottles are looking a bit sparse in my post (oops).

I have been loving the Mango flavour with a handful of ice, some soda water and lemon. I’m hoping this will make the bottles last longer 🤞🏼. The pomegranate is also SO yum with the same combo. I’m not going to lie, I always judge books by their covers and the packaging wouldn’t grab my attention in the supermarket, but the colours of the drinks would be enough to pique my curiosity.

This sweltering heat wave has me craving sugar, icy poles and fresh and juicy fruits. The Hola Aloe drinks are a great alternative to those sugary drinks your dentist tells you not to drink! Perfect for an Aussie BBQ and is something everyone can enjoy in punch or on its own!

Let me know if you’ve seen these guys in stores or if you love aloe drinks!

Note to self: next time I have to review a product, take pics BEFORE posting so they don’t look half full!

Highway Rest Stops, Korean Style

I wanted to use this powerful blogging platform to share with you one of my favourite tourist attractions in South Korea: the humble highway rest stop. Perhaps it’s because of the relief from getting out of a car during a long trip to stretch your legs. Or maybe it’s the delicious offerings that they have? In Korean, these little pockets of road trip heaven are called a ‘Hyugeso’ or 휴게소 in Korean!

You can only really access these stops if you’re heading out of town. Most bus trips that are long enough will take a 15 minute rest at one of these places. My face literally lit up when I heard the announcement that we were about to pull into a Hyugeso over the weekend. We travelled from Yeosu to Seoul which is about a four hour drive so a stop for hotdogs and walnut cakes was a necessity! However, the short allotted time period will make you feel like you’re on a reality game show where you have to see how much street food you can consume in 15 minutes with a toilet break thrown in somewhere. Continue reading to see the rest stops in all of their glory.

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Lots of buses at the highway rest stop, South Korea

It is widely known that when the sun starts to set in the mountains, it is time to stop at a ‘Hyugeso’ and eat until your heart’s content. It’s a very famous proverb first used during the Goreyo dynasty. That’s a ‘chicken or egg’, ‘car or rest stop’ question we don’t have time to answer here today and I am obviosly joking.

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a highway rest stop, South Korea
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People buying food at the highway rest stop in South Korea
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A corn dog at the rest stop in Korea
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My favourite! ‘Walnut cakes’ at the rest stop in South Korea
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Korean Walnut Cakes

So, let me introduce you to the main reason I love Hyugeso’s: walnut cakes. In Korean they’re called ‘hodu gwaja’ which translates to walnut snacks. (The word ‘cracker’ really undersells the soft pockets of heaven that you will find in your $3 bag that you will inevitably buy after reading such an influential blog post as this). The walnut cakes are filled with sweet and silky red bean paste and are best served hot, fresh from the Ajumma selling them to you. These are tricky to find beyond the confines of a Korean highway rest area but, in my not so humble opinion, it’s worth organising a quick bus/car getaway to try them out. Or even worth an impromptu South Korea trip you didn’t know you needed. Not really. But really.

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Have you tried anything at a Korean highway rest stop? Let me know what your favourite snacks are and I’ll be sure to give them a try! Leave a comment below!