Once You Bibim, You Can’t Go Bap

This post is from my July 25 Picnic in Your Pocket Newsletter on Substack – Subscribe Here

Hello and welcome to another episode of Picnic in Your Pocket! I don’t know what to call newsletters, are they episodes, editions, free therapy sessions? Who knows? I don’t have a lot to update you on for this newsletter because as you will see, this week I spent a lot of time watching videos of people making hard candy, rainbow roll cake and a whole lot of Korean egg dishes. It was a very enlightening week (emotionally).

This week of uneventfulness largely came down to the fact that Korea is in its fourth wave of coronavirus and I have a phobia of leaving my house. This is on top of the fact that it is far too hot in Seoul to go outside for more than 5 minutes. This explains all of the food porn I consumed. I hope your last week was slightly more eventful for you, wherever you are in the world. I also hope that you enjoy this tiny pocket of fun on your Sunday evening and consider subscribing to my weekly newsletter!


Here are three things I spent a lot of time thinking about this week:

Can the government just hurry up and microchip me already?

Most aspects of living life abroad are great… until it comes time to do some kind of bureaucratic task in Australia from Korea. I spent multiple hours of my days last week trying to prove to my iPhone that I was who I said I was. I felt like some kind of crypto hacker trying to crack through every step of a company’s security. It was at that moment that I wished I could just scan a chip from my eyeball or wrist and put the days of trying to prove that I’m not a robot, behind me. In theory, it sounds great but I am sure this is not something that would go down well with the vast majority of Australians. I will just continue to assume that I have committed some sort of tax evasion and deal with the consequences later.

Is covid making me more anxious or was I always this anxious? Now that all of my brain thoughts are amplified by the fact that I don’t leave my house or socialise… a real chicken or the egg situation.

Well, I don’t know about you, but I won’t be unpacking this web of anxiety any time soon.

The billionaire space race is essentially a K-Drama… and it writes itself

Bear with me on this one. Last week, one of the billionaires flew to.. space? Or the edge of the atmosphere? I honestly don’t care about the logistics of their flight path. All I know is that a middle-aged wealthy cowboy launched a phallic shuttle into the air and wasn’t completely obliterated by the media and all of his childhood friends?

But back to the analogy… The strong female lead in this K-Drama is played by Earth herself. Earth just wants to make sure that her family is safe and happy so that she can rise through the ranks at her solar energy startup. Her family are super progressive and don’t really care if she gets married or not. She just wants to get promoted at work without the support of her nepotistic childhood billionaire friend. Said friend is the owner of the solar energy startup and also happens to be planning a space mission. But Earth’s new next-door neighbour isn’t having any of that and wants to try and get to space first so she will fall in love with him. He owns a tiny bookstore internet company that exploits its workers for optimized KPIs and world domination. He manages to go to space first, dressed as a cowboy and fails to impress Earth and her close friends. Ultimately (and this one is a spoiler alert), the strong female lead ends up rejecting both of them because she feels she and her family would be better off without their toxic energy and she moves to the Korean countryside to devote her life to growing strawberries. I smell a Netflix hit!


Weekly Doodle

This week’s doodle is a joke I said to my husband and turned into a drawing. We ordered a take away Korean lunch box and he told me I had a choice of putting sauce in my lunch box and turning it into bibimbap or leaving the sauce off altogether. And I made this joke that was even less hilarious at that moment than it is now as a doodle.


This Week’s Video:

Summer Outfits I Never Wear

This week, I decided to film myself in my bedroom styling clothes that I love. It’s one of the secret things that I do that nobody knows about but it brings me a lot of joy. I have been doing this since I was at LEAST 14. This hobby resulted in many questionable outfits. I talk a bit more about why you should just do things you want to do and not worry about whether or not people think you are completely just the worst ever… in this video!


On the Blog

Fortune Telling Dispenser in Ikseong-dong, Seoul

A few weeks ago, my friend Miranda and I ventured to Ikseongdong and Insadong for an afternoon of exploring. These areas of Seoul are full of Korean Hanok homes and traditional art, clothing, and tea houses. You must visit this part of Seoul on your next visit to South Korea.

The fortune was all in Korean and it was nonsense, but it was fun to have a nice day out with a friend in a place I haven’t been to since 2017!

Continue reading here link


Favourite follow on IG this week:

@marloesdevee

I didn’t spend too much time exploring new Instagram accounts this week, so I wanted to shout out an old favourite of mine. Marloes is a Dutch artist of all trades. Recently she has been making beautiful collages and landscape paintings. Definitely follow along with her work if you love to see happy and bright colours in your feed. Marloes is actually the person who inspired me to start my own newsletter!


What I watched this week

Bling Empire (2021)

I’m not proud of it, but it happened. After ending up in a YouTube hole instead of sleeping at an appropriate time, I found my way to Netflix’s ‘Bling Empire’. The show is a docu-series (reality show) that follows the filthy rich lives of wealthy Asians in Los Angeles. As a concept, this show is terrible. As a show, this show is terrible. I could only watch a few episodes before I gave up. However, I will say that Kevin (pictured right) and Kane (left) had amazing friend-chemistry in the show and should definitely do some kind of spinoff together. All of the others seemed like caricatures of themselves, fighting for screen time. This is me telling you not to watch it. Save yourself.

Billionaires, Explained (2019)

After trying to get through a few episodes of IRL Crazy Rich Asians, I decided to delve further into the idea of billionaires and wealthy people to try and understand them better. Maybe I was missing something when it came to incredible wealth? Maybe they were just misunderstood! Turns out, I wasn’t missing anything but it is nice to know that billionaires are such kind and compassionate people. Both shows I mentioned are available to stream on Netflix. Is streaming even the right verb to use for Netflix or are we just using Netflix as a verb?


The song I can’t stop listening to:

This week I listened to a lot less music than I normally do. However, I managed to find a lot of comfort from watching YouTube videos of people making cakes and Korean street food. Does anyone else like to watch those videos? I find that they help me zone out from my brain overthinking every minute detail of my life and help me focus on things like whipped cream and rainbow cheese instead. Very therapeutic. Here is one of the highlights from this week: Rainbow roll cake!https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/LRH_bEzN3ZU?rel=0&autoplay=0&showinfo=0&enablejsapi=0


Goals for This Week

TL;DR Going to the dentist is my nightmare

If you tuned into my newsletter last week, you might have read that I tried to reduce my caffeine and alcohol intake. If you know me personally, you may have guessed that I would fail my goals miserably. You guessed correctly. And I enjoyed every sip.

This week is the last week of my life sabbatical. I will be re-entering the workforce in August, so I have to try and rest a lot and pretend to do a lot of yoga to feel zen. My only goal for this week is to go to the dentist and catch up on my study for an online course that is way too difficult for me. They are my must-dos. Any other dentist fearers out there? Hopefully, this will be a better week for my goals and an okay week for my teeth.


Thank you for reading. Have a great week and don’t forget to offset your carbon footprint by not leaving your bed for a week XX


Why stop here? The fun continues…

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Yeah, this isn’t going well — Working remotely in South Korea

I’m calling it. Remote working just doesn’t work in South Korea.

I’m a month into my remote working journey. I’m surprised, confused, proud and exhausted that I’ve made it this far.

Throughout the course of the pandemic, I have largely avoided working from home. I have had an odd couple of days at home here and a few half-day in-person meetings there. But mostly, it has been me at a desk in an office with endless supplies of sugary snacks and shit coffee.

South Korea has not made working from home a mandatory thing over the last two years. We are now in our fourth wave of the pandemic, and social distancing restrictions are the toughest they have ever been. So tough that the Level 4 social distancing rules have a policy stating that gym-goers must ‘maintain a treadmill speed of 6km/hr or slower, replacing high-intensity aerobic exercise with low-intensity aerobic exercise’. That is an actual rule. Mandated by the government. Sure, you can work in an office and eat in restaurants until 10 pm, but don’t you dare run too fast around people?

There have been guidelines and ‘suggestions’ for keeping office capacity at a certain level… Buuut most companies are keeping their workers indoors. In offices. On subways. In restaurants, during lunchtime peaks. It’s preposterous. I am a Melburnian, and although I didn’t struggle through 2 years of lockdowns like my friends and family, reading the Korean social distancing guidelines actually makes me feel embarrassed.

Photo by Mikey Harris on Unsplash

The startup I work for is working entirely remotely. It’s not going well.

When I moved to my new company a month ago, I attended my orientation online. They shipped a laptop out and said “good luck”. Well, they implied it anyway. I had seen people do this on LinkedIn. I knew it was a thing that happened a lot last year but experiencing it for myself, ugh. I had a 9:30 am meeting to get introduced and then that was it. No email from my new boss. No mention of what I’d be doing or who I’d be working with. Just. You know… have a good day!? Yeah, cheers.

So what does working from home do for the Korean population? Ah, why it gives us more time to work of course. No commute? No worries! Just add on 2, 3 maybe 4 extra hours to your workday! You’re not commuting anymore so you have more energy to work!? You’re at home so work during your lunch break!

Behind Colombia and Mexico, South Korea have the longest working hours in the developed world. On average in 2020, South Koreans worked a total of 1,908 hours in a year. Back home in Australia, my homeland, people work 1,683 hours per year. If I lived in Australia, I could have an extra 200 odd extra hours in my year to sleep or eat a proper meal or actually complete the projects I start in my spare time.

While nobody in my company is forcing me to work overtime, the overwhelming majority of the staff in Korea are sending emails and slack messages at all hours of the day. Our teams in other global offices are also largely working remotely, but they are not replying to our emails and messages at ungodly hours of the evening.

So, the only conclusion that I can draw is…. working from home just doesn’t work here in Korea.

Staff are always going to feel pressure to work long hours no matter how they are working. It is the nature, the heartbeat of this nation. As I said, we are not being forced to work longer hours. It just sort of happens. But you can bet your bottom dollar that I clock out on time every day. I have way too many failed hobbies and sources of joy outside of my work to waste my life working overtime.

An emergency that requires immediate action? Overtime work, sure. A deadline that I have to meet or other people are affected? Overtime? Yes, I’ll do it. But normal Monday evening on a summer’s day with no obvious mishaps or deadlines? Overtime? Absolutely-fucking-not. I mean, *priceless*.

All I can say is, man, I really hope nobody from my company reads this.

Good luck out there people, and don’t let work get you down. Take care of yourselves, your brain does wonderful things when it’s fed and rested.


This was originally published on my Medium blog – go chekitout.

Like my words? Well read more of them:

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Or here on my new Instagram that is just drawings

Or on Twitter but to be honest, who uses Twitter? But also, follow me.

This is What Summer Looks Like in South Korea

Walking through my neighbourhood this week, I captured the essence of what summer looks like in South Korea. Empty coffee cups everywhere. Empty packets of cigarettes. This area has a lot of office buildings and it is not uncommon to see office workers standing around smoking and drinking a LOT of ice coffee. Yes, even during this pandemic.

I don’t know what Korea’s obsession with iced drinks is, but it is obviously making sense during this heat wave here in Seoul. However, it is pretty common to see people drinking these in the winter. Any office I have worked in has had a pretty consistent background noise of someone fetching ice from a fridge or dispenser of some kind. People need their beverages iced and they need them now.

With the window illustration in the background of this image, I thought this moment was so quintessentially Korean. It’s as though the two characters are admiring all of the coffee cups that have helped fuel workers throughout their day. Like, ‘good job you guys, you’re doing good work here’.

Of course, the bigger question that this photo alludes to is a nation’s obsession with plastic. I haven’t really spoken about it on my blog but Korea is plastic-obsessed. Things are wrapped up in plastic, bagged in plastic and served in plastic. The problem is not the plastic, it’s that people don’t seem to care.

The day I see a majority of Koreans using reusable bags for shopping and reusable cubs for their coffee order will be a miraculous milestone. But spoiler alert, I don’t see it happening any time soon. As long as the consumers continue to demand highly efficient products and services, without any consideration for plastic consumption, the big conglomerates will continue to provide. It’s that simple.

A real change needs to happen on a day to day behavioural level and I honestly think it’s going to have to come from K-dramas, K-pop stars or some kind of social media movement. That’s a long way off in my mind considering that people are still trying to figure out that feminism isn’t about hating men.

A photo of empty coffee cups and empty cigarette packets on the streets of Seoul, South Korea
Summer summed up in Seoul, South Korea

How to Make Korean Bibim Cold Noodles

How to Make Korean ‘Bibim’ Cold Noodles

This week I was asked to evaluate some delicious Korean foods that are being exported to the Australian market. One of the items in the package was ‘Bibim Noodles’, aka Korean cold instant noodles that are perfect for summer. I thought it would be a good idea to make a video on how to make Korean ‘Bibim’ cold noodles. I have a sneaky feeling that western people don’t know a lot about making cold noodles. So here it is! The people asked, and I delivered.

I have to admit, when I first tried these ‘Bibimmyeon’ or ‘Bibim Noodles’ back in 2017, I was not a huge fan. I am happy to report that after being reintroduced to them for this project, and I am already a huge fan. We only have one packet left!

In Korean ‘Bibim’ means mixed and ‘Myeon’ means Noodles. So they are literally mixed noodles. They can be served either warm or cold, but because of this sweltering Seoul heat, I decided to show you how to make them cold.

This video contains the simple steps needed to make the cold noodles. All you need to do is boil some water, cook the noodles, drain the water, mix the noodles in some cold water (and ice!), add the sauce and mix! I added some colourful peeled cucumber, seaweed and chilli flakes for the fun of it. I really enjoyed making this video and I decided to edit it with a really chilled, ASMR type, in the cafe listening to jazz piano vibe. Enjoy! Let me know if you have tried Bibimmyeon in the comments!

Watch the full video on YouTube here and subscribe to my channel!

Korean Cold Noodles

More Food Content

Hola Aloe – Korean Heat Wave Drink Idea

🍋 Hola Hola! 🥭

This week I got to sample a bunch of yummy Korean products that are entering the Australian market. It is part of the KFoodies program! I am not usually a fan of Aloe drinks but these Hola Aloe flavoured drinks are delish! The whole household has been enjoying them this week so the bottles are looking a bit sparse in my post (oops).

I have been loving the Mango flavour with a handful of ice, some soda water and lemon. I’m hoping this will make the bottles last longer 🤞🏼. The pomegranate is also SO yum with the same combo. I’m not going to lie, I always judge books by their covers and the packaging wouldn’t grab my attention in the supermarket, but the colours of the drinks would be enough to pique my curiosity.

This sweltering heat wave has me craving sugar, icy poles and fresh and juicy fruits. The Hola Aloe drinks are a great alternative to those sugary drinks your dentist tells you not to drink! Perfect for an Aussie BBQ and is something everyone can enjoy in punch or on its own!

Let me know if you’ve seen these guys in stores or if you love aloe drinks!

Note to self: next time I have to review a product, take pics BEFORE posting so they don’t look half full!

Aussie Brunch at Summer Lane, Hannam

Have you been wanting to explore new parts of Seoul? No? Oh, that’s cool! Oh, you don’t live in Seoul and this post is irrelevant to you? But you want to know anyway for when you inevitably travel here in a post-pandemic world where life is free and maskless? Okay, cool. Let’s see Hannam!

Hannam is a wealthy suburb in Seoul located next to Itaewon, conveniently situated in front of the Han River. It is a great place for shopping, cafe hunting, photo taking and it’s great for spying on some of the most expensive houses in Seoul. It also happens to be where our beloved BTS members live. I highly doubt they leave their house and I also highly doubt they spend a lot of time in their homes. So where do they go? Who knows. But I can guarantee if I ever saw a BTS member on the loose I wouldn’t recognise them without makeup and a Louis Vuitton ensemble.

My cafe recommendation for this area is Summer Lane Brunch. It is an Australian style brunch spot located in Hannam (or Itaewon, I’m not sure how Seoul geography works). If you are looking for some Aussie brunch and coffee, this HAS to be the next cafe you go to in Seoul. Here are the deets:

Summer Lane Brunch

49, Itaewon-ro 55ga-gil, Yongsan-gu Seoul, Korea

Opens 7:30 am to 18:00 pm every day

How to Get Lost in Hannam:

After you fill up on Aussie sausage rolls and Duke’s coffee, head in the direction of the ‘Nine One Hannam’ apartment complex. On your way down the stairs, you will find cafes, clothing stores, pubs, book stores and everything else you need to live a cultured and colourful Insta-worthy life.

Where to buy furniture in Seoul

Nobody likes furniture shopping, especially not when you are an ex-pat in a new foreign country. Unless you have a lot of money and boatloads of spare time. After this blog post blows up the internet, maybe I’ll have some of that. When I first came to Seoul, I had no idea how to buy furniture for our tiny apartment. Now that I’ve been here for two years, I know a thing or two about the best places to shop for furniture here in Korea both online and offline.

Last year, I briefly worked in a Korean company as an interior designer. We are all still scratching our heads and trying to figure out how that happened. I learned a thing or two about how not to buy furniture. I was a terrible interior designer. But here’s some advice that doesn’t suck.

Where to buy cheap-ish furniture in-store in South Korea

Full disclosure, I am a huge fan of furniture and homewares. If you are just after basics to get by with, check out Facebook groups and also Craigslist Seoul. But, if you are buying new bits, these are some of the places I have purchased cheap items from or dreamed of buying from (in no particular order).

You can buy cheap furniture in Korea at Lotte Mart, H&M Home (I like the one in Yongsan), IKEA, Emart Grocery Stores and Zara Home (My favourite location is at IFC Mall in Yeoido)

Zara Home, Yeoido
Zara Home, Yeoido
Furniture at an Emart in Gyeonggi-do

Special mention for homewares goes to…

Jaju is one of my FAVOURITE homewares stores in Korea. ‘Jaju’ in Korean means ‘often’, so they sell all of those items in your home that you use often. It is very much like a Korean version of Muji but with more colour and more of a Scandinavian feeling. If you are looking for storage solutions, textiles, cookware, kitchen utensils, rubbish bins and other small storage furniture, definitely check out Jaju. Most Emart supermarkets have a Jaju located in their stores. Jaju is owned by Shinsegae who also own Emart supermarkets.

So, if you are sick of buying cheap, low-quality items from Daiso, hit up Jaju! They also have cute pyjamas and clothing items which I am currently eyeing up!

I don’t own this image*

Where to buy furniture in South Korea online

There are so many great sites in Korea for buying furniture online. If Korean is not your strong suit, I recommend viewing these sites in your browser. If you look at them in your browser, you can easily translate the pages into English to help you navigate to the products you need.

These are just some of my favourite places to buy furniture online in Korea. I have used most of these sites so I can definitely recommend them. You may need someone’s help ordering things online if you are new to Korea!

Today House

Today House Website

Market B

Market B Website

Coupang

Coupang online website

Where to buy mid-range furniture in Korea (in-store and online)

Muji – Great products but they are quite pricey and there are very limited styles

Hanssem – One of the top furniture brands in Korea and is kind of similar to IKEA. Hanssem has showrooms all around Korea with a range of low-price to mid-range furniture. Hanssem has amazing customer service in-store, I can highly recommend them if you are buying new pieces for your home.

Hanssem Korea website

iloom – I have never shopped with iloom but they are another top brand in Korea. I personally really love some of their designs but I have no experience with their website or customer service.

iloom website

Casamia – I have never shopped here but I often go into their stores to gawk at their huge sofas and beautiful styling. Keep an eye out for their sales!

Casamia Website

Yongsan Living Park

Yongsan living park shopping mall

Upmarket furniture in Korea

Alloso

Alloso website

West Elm

Department Stores like Shinsegae or Lotte department store

Yongsan Living Park has a great range of furniture that is on the pricier side and is located right above the train station. There is also a Hanssem store there!

Bonus Round: Where to buy a bed in Korea?

Brandless

We bought our bedhead and mattress from Brandless last year and we absolutely love it. They are really affordable and have a lot of showrooms around Korea for you to go and test out their beds. Definitely my favourite bed store in Korea!

IKEA

Casamia

Muji

Want to see my house?

Last year, I made a video touring my house here in South Korea! A lot has changed since we filmed it so I’m thinking I might need to make another one.

More home content:

Any suggestions?

If you have some more tips and tricks about furniture shopping in Korea, help a girl out below.

Moving Offices in Seoul, South Korea

This morning, I went into my office for the first time in a few weeks. We have been working from home for the most part due to the recent wave of covid cases here in South Korea. This week, we are moving to a new office on the other side of Seoul. Tomorrow is our last day in our Myeongdong office that sits right in front of the Cheonggyecheon stream.

On my morning commute, I decided to prolong entering our building to walk around the area, take pictures and enjoy a warm coffee. This won’t be the last time I visit this area, but I just wanted to soak it all in. I had so many good memories in this area in summery Seoul in September. Somehow it didn’t have the same charm on this particularly chilly winter morning.

This move has come at a great time, we can kick off our 2021 in a brand new space!

Korean word of the week: ‘방콕’

Korean word of the week ‘방콕’ or ‘집콕’ ~ it means to stay in your house/room and do nothing. It is also spelled the same way as ‘Bangkok’, so if someone asks you where will go on holiday, you can either say ‘나는 방콕 갈거에요 = I’m going to Bangkok’, or ‘나는 방콕 할거에요 = I’m going to stay at home and do nothing all day’. 그래서, 오늘은 제가 하루종일 방콕 할거에요! 여러분들도 집에 계속 있으면 좋겠어요.

Last week, I posted this word on my instagram and thought I would put it up here for my 3 readers! This word has a new meaning now that most of us are staying inside, away from public spaces and keeping our distance. I thought I would share it here! Have a Merry Christmas and I hope you are staying safe and sound.

Here are some of my recent ‘방콕’ style videos from my channel! Enjoy.

How to get a non-teaching job in South Korea

Hi job seekers, are you having a hard time finding a job in Korea? I’m sorry to hear that, but it’s also a pretty normal and common situation to be in as an expat. So it’s fine. It’ll be fine. You’re fine. BUT, just in case, I’m here to give you some handy tips on how to get started with what may feel like a never-ending quest. I have a degree in job rejection, but luckily I got a PhD in bouncing back. First, let’s break some things down with a series of questions to see where you’re at, and then you’ll get all of the juicy links to the sites and the things.

First things first, what kind of visa do you have in Korea?

The type of visa you have is the key ingredient employers are looking for in Korea. If a job description explicitly states the visa requirements you must fulfill, make sure you fulfill them! Wow, what great advice!

Do not bother applying for jobs if you don’t have the correct visa. It is a waste of time for both you and the employer.

Here is a good article that explains the different work visas here in Korea. Please note, it does not include F visas. Make sure you are aware of any working restrictions your visa has and whether or not your potential employer would be willing to sponsor you. Once you have sorted that out, let’s move onto the next step.

Photo by Jana Sabeth on Unsplash

Why do you want to work in South Korea?

This sounds like a pretty simple question, but it is important for your job search. The answer to this question will help you determine where to look for a job and what to include in your applications and CVs.

Are you interested in the language? Are you interested in a particular industry that is unique to South Korea? Have you been studying Korean? Etc.

If your answer to any of these questions is, ‘because I love BTS and I want to be a professional ARMY member’, then it might be time to think seriously about what you want to do in Korea!

How should I write a CV in Korea and do people need Cover Letters?

It is okay to submit CVs in English to many jobs here in Korea. If you are a fluent Korean speaker, you will need to submit your CV in Korean as a Word document (from what I have seen). Additional documents like portfolios and cover letters can also be in English, in whatever format you desire (but just check what the employer wants). Make sure you tailor your CV and portfolio to the specific job you want to apply for. You should never use the same CV on jobs with different job descriptions. If you want to know more about this process, scroll down to watch a YouTube video that I made about starting your career overseas! Some jobs will ask for a cover letter, but it is not a common requirement in Korea.

Websites for Job Hunting in Korea

Glassdoor / LinkedIn

Korean companies use these job sites to post jobs. *Shocking*. Most job postings are in Korean, but foreign companies typically post their listings in English. It is a good idea to turn on notifications for particular searches to get notified when the perfect job pops up! For example, turn on notifications on LinkedIn for ‘Engineering Roles in Seoul’. Make sure your profile is in good shape before you start applying for every job you see.

Non-Teaching Job Seekers Korea (Facebook Group)

This is a FB group run by foreigners in Korea and is a great place to join during your job search. It has a wide range of jobs on there but they are posted sporadically. Foreign employers will often post about opportunities at their companies. You have to request to join, and make sure you follow all of their rules!

Craigslist

Sadly, Craigslist is the preferred method for hiring foreign workers in South Korea. Nobody is happy about it, but you can occasionally find a diamond in the rough, so it is worth checking periodically. Be careful about scammers and weirdos. If a job posting has a link to their website, that’s usually a good indication that it’s legitimate. I have been to several job interviews through Craigslist and have had multiple jobs through the platform. BUT be smart and don’t expect to find your dream job!

Seoul Global Center Job Search

The Seoul Global Center is a great resource for foreigners living in Korea. They have multiple centers in Seoul and host Korean classes, cooking classes and other cultural events. The Jobs board is not updated frequently, but always keep your eye out for any opportunities that may come up!

If you have Korean skills, try here:

Saramin

Job Korea

Startup-specific Job Boards

Rocket Punch

It’s like Korean LinkedIn for Startups – Requires Korean Skills

Seoul Startups Job Board

Great place to find jobs in the Seoul startup scene. It is also worth joining their Slack group as people often post jobs and events happening in there. It is an amazing community and has been really helpful for me in Korea.

Job Bridge Korea

Another site that looks specifically for foreign workers in Korea.

Instagram Communities

When all else fails, find people on Instagram who work in your desired industry, and follow them. It is a good idea to build up a community on social media, no matter which country you want to live in. Not only can it help you network for your career, but it can also help you find friends, feel less lonely and learn about what’s happening around town.

My videos about working in Korea:

Life in Korea Blog Content